BMW CCA Foundation Issue #4 Newsletter Here!

http://www.bmwccafoundation.org/latest-news/newsletter-2/

New BMW CCA Foundation newsletter!

Read issue three here!: http://browndigital.bpc.com/publication?i=221024

NORTH AMERICA’S PREMIER BMW TUNER STEVE DINAN JOINS BMW CCA
FOUNDATION HONORARY COMMITTEE FOR CAPITAL CAMPAIGN

Dinan Set to Support $7 Million Campaign for Street Survival® Teen Driver Safety Education
 and the Foundation Library, Archives and Museum

Greer, SC, July 24, 2014 – The BMW Car Club of America (CCA) Foundation announced today that Steve Dinan, president and  founder of Dinan® Engineering, has joined the Honorary Committee for “The Ultimate Driving Community . . . Building the Foundation” Capital Campaign of the BMW CCA Foundation, a campaign to raise funds for teen driver safety programs and the preservation of BMW history.

An avid racer and North America’s premier BMW tuner, Dinan joins icons of motorsports Skip Barber, David Hobbs and R.J. Valentine on the Honorary Committee.  The mission of the Honorary Committee is to spread the messages of the Capital Campaign with particular emphasis on supporting educational programs that give back to the automotive community – primarily teaching teens through the Street Survival® program to survive their most dangerous years on the road.  Honorary Committee members help influence and encourage others to endorse the expansion of Street Survival and support the Foundation’s new building and land acquisition.

 “In 1976, I met fellow Honorary Committee member David Hobbs at an IMSA race. He was driving a BMW 320i and won the race, so I bought a 1977 320i and a turbo kit to enhance it. The turbo kit wasn’t great, so I decided to fix it – I’m the kind of person that likes to make things better – that’s how I got into developing and manufacturing high performance products and systems for BMWs,” said Dinan.  “Because I like to improve things, helping educate teens in their own cars to become better and safer drivers is an important platform for me and I look forward to supporting the BMW CCA Foundation’s Capital Campaign.”

“It is a pleasure to have legendary BMW tuner Steve Dinan join our Honorary Committee,” said Leo Newland, president, BMW CCA Foundation. “With his BMW performance heritage and enthusiasm, Steve is the perfect person to help us drive the Capital Campaign’s objectives to raise $7 million for Street Survival programs and the preservation of BMW history.”

Street Survival is built upon the premise that safe driving is learned by doing.  With the help of corporate sponsors Tire Rack, Michelin, BMW NA and Enterprise, the BMW CCA Foundation has offered subsidized car control training to teenagers across the United States since 2003. The program is hands-on and is designed to go beyond the typical high school driver’s education course. Street Survival is unique in that it offers students instruction in their own cars so that they learn the limitations of the car they drive daily. With volunteers and support from the BMW CCA, the Sports Car Club of America, the Porsche Club of America, the Corvette Club of America and the Audi Club North America, the BMW CCA Foundation held 101 schools in over 65 locations in 2013.

To date, the Capital Campaign has raised $1.2 million towards the goal of $7 million. To help support teen driver education, preserve BMW history and contribute to the campaign, visit the BMW CCA Foundation website.

About BMW Car Club of America Foundation

The BMW Car Club of America Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of teen driver safety and the preservation of BMW history. Established in 2002 in Greenville, SC with initial capitalization from the BMW Car Club of America, the Foundation focuses on three initiatives to foster educational programs for the automotive community and be a significant repository of BMW information and history:  Street Survival® teen driver safety program; the Library, Archive & Museum Program; and the Conservation and Preservation Program. Through “The Ultimate Driving Community . . . Building the Foundation” Capital Campaign launched in 2013, the Foundation has raised $1.2 million of the $7 million required to support and grow these initiatives that will help save lives and preserve the legacy of BMW’s heritage.

$7 Million Campaign Set to Raise Funds for Street Survival® Teen Driver Safety Education and the Foundation Library, Archives and Museum

Greenville, SC, July 14, 2014 – The BMW Car Club of America (CCA) Foundation announced today that three renowned race car drivers – Skip Barber, David Hobbs and R.J. Valentine – have joined the Honorary Committee for “The Ultimate Driving Community . . . Building the Foundation” Capital Campaign of the BMW CCA Foundation, a campaign to raise funds for teen driver safety programs and the preservation of BMW history.

As members of the Honorary Committee, Barber, Hobbs and Valentine are sharing their motorsports passion by supporting educational programs that give back to the automotive community – primarily teaching teens through the Street Survival® program to survive their most dangerous years on the road.  Honorary Committee members will help influence and encourage others to endorse the expansion of Street Survival and support the Foundation’s new building and land acquisition.

“We are thrilled to have these celebrated race car drivers join our Honorary Committee,” said Leo Newland, president, BMW CCA Foundation. “With the support of the Honorary Committee, I am confident we will reach not only our $7 million campaign goal, but also meet the target of doubling the number of Street Survival classes offered over the next five years.”

Street Survival is built upon the premise that safe driving is learned by doing.  With the help of corporate sponsors Tire Rack, Michelin, BMW NA and Enterprise, the BMW CCA Foundation has offered subsidized car control training to teenagers across the United States since 2003. The program is hands-on and is designed to go beyond the typical high school driver’s education course. Street Survival is unique in that it offers students instruction in their own cars so that they learn the limitations of the car they drive daily. With volunteers and support from the BMW CCA, the Sports Car Club of America, the Porsche Club of America, the Corvette Club of America and the Audi Club North America, the BMW CCA Foundation held 101 schools in over 65 locations in 2013.

To date, the Capital Campaign has raised $1.3 million towards the goal of $7 million. Stay tuned for campaign updates and profiles of Honorary Committee members. To help support teen driver education, preserve BMW history and contribute to the campaign, visit the BMW CCA Foundation website.

About BMW Car Club of America Foundation

The BMW Car Club of America Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of teen driver safety and the preservation of BMW history. Established in 2002 in Greenville, SC with initial capitalization from the BMW Car Club of America, the Foundation focuses on three initiatives to foster educational programs for the automotive community and be a significant repository of BMW information and history:  Street Survival® teen driver safety program; the Library, Archive & Museum Program; and the Conservation and Preservation Program. Through “The Ultimate Driving Community . . . Building the Foundation” Capital Campaign launched in 2013, the Foundation has raised $1.3 million of the $7 million required to support and grow these initiatives that will help save lives and preserve the legacy of BMW’s heritage.

Click here to listen to the interview

Bill Wade operates an advanced driving safety program for teens that gives them a first hand look at challenging driving situations and the opportunity to react to them under controlled conditions.  Operated with assistance from members of the Porsche Club of America and the BMW Car Club of America, Tire Rack Street Survival will train teen drivers at 100 events this year.

Young drivers are be presented with many of the real-world challenges that they may someday confront on the road: sharp turns, wet roads, tailgaters, and a host of other hazards.  All under the watchful eye of a trained instructor.

In this interview Bill shares the genesis of the program more than 10 years ago and walks the listener through a typical day of eye-opening training.

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, and from Virginia to California, the traffic safety community has a simple message for drivers: One Text or Call could Wreck it All.

DOT has worked hard for several years to end the deadly epidemic of distracted driving.  But to kickoff this month, I want to thank the States for their efforts in this important safety fight.

Distracted Driving is no joke

In California, where texting and talking on a hand-held cell phone while driving are against the law, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and more than 200 local law enforcement agencies will crack down on drivers text messaging and talking on their cell phones behind the wheel.  Is the California law working? Just two years after the state’s ban went into effect, road fatalities had fallen 22 percent. Read more: http://fastlane.dot.gov/2012/04/april-is-distracted-driving-awareness-month.html

Tire Rack Street Survival hosted its first ever Best Practices Summit this past weekend at the South Pointe Resort in Las Vegas. Conducted as a joint effort all day Sunday by teams from the BMW CCA and SCCA Foundations; the conference included talks by various Street Survival key volunteers, with a rousing keynote speech by Ronn Langford of MasterDrive.

With an agenda carefully crafted by Bill Wade, Street Survival National Manager; Bruce Smith, BMW CCA Foundation Trustee; with Jeff Jacobs and Raleigh Boreen, SCCA Foundation Trustees – The Street Survival Summit gave a room filled to capacity of volunteers the opportunity to interact with a community of peers, all of whom offered solutions to many of the challenges faced by the program. The conference focused on themes such as fundraising strategies, expanding volunteer participation, site selection, and building partnerships.

The event was subsidized in part by grants from Tire Rack and Michelin NA; and was the site for the long-awaited announcement that Enterprise Holdings will be coming on board as a partner sponsor of Street Survival in 2012.

Although the report from the Governors Highway Safety Administration shows a disappointing increase in deaths among 16- and 17-year-old drivers in the first half of 2011, the longer-term data in the report highlight the success of graduated driver licensing (GDL). A decade of legislative victories improved teen driver licensing systems and led to eight consecutive years of falling fatality levels from 2003 to 2010. Teen driver deaths have fallen more than 50 percent during the 15 years since passage of the nation’s first three-stage GDL system in 1996. The pace of new GDL enactments has slowed considerably during the last couple years, however. If state legislatures continue to improve licensing processes for teens, we can resume our progress in keeping teens safe on the road.

As an advocate on teen driver safety for more than 75 years and a leader in advocacy and research into better teen licensing, AAA concurs with report recommendations that improving laws and increasing compliance with state GDL systems are two key opportunities to resume the downward trend in teen driver deaths.

Graduated driver licensing has been shown to be highly effective at reducing teen crashes, deaths, and injuries, but it is not our only path to improving teen driver safety. Parents play a key role in setting rules and working with their teens to become safe teen drivers. AAA has a range of programs that can help parents keep their teens safe on the road, from driver education classes and parent-teen driving agreements to our award-winning teen driver safety website for families, www.teendriving.aaa.com.

via AAA

Teens who think of themselves as thrill-seekers and who believe their parents don’t set rules are among the most likely to drive with other teens in the car, which in many states violates graduated licensing laws, a new study finds.

And a second study of teens involved in serious accidents found that for those carrying other teen passengers, distraction and risky driving behavior often played a role.

It’s long been known that having teen passengers increases a teen driver’s crash risk, according to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers, but it hasn’t been well understood how this these passengers actually increase crash risk.

“These studies help us understand the factors that may predispose teens to drive with multiple friends and how those passengers may contribute to crashes by distracting the driver and promoting risky driving behaviors, such as speeding, tailgating or weaving,” study author Allison Curry, director of epidemiology at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention, said in a hospital news release.

“Knowing this, we can develop programs that work in tandem with current graduated driver licensing laws that limit the number of passengers for teens during their first year of driving,” she added.

In the first study, Curry and colleagues surveyed 198 teen drivers and found that those mostly likely to transport their friends shared a number of characteristics. They considered themselves thrill-seekers, said their parents didn’t set rules or monitor their whereabouts, and had a poor understanding about the overall risk of driving.

“The good news is that that these teens make up the minority,” study author and behavioral researcher Jessica Mirman said in the news release. “Teens in this study generally reported strong perceptions of the risks of driving, low frequencies of driving with multiple passengers and strong beliefs that their parents monitored their behavior and set rules.”

The second study looked at a nationally representative sample of 677 teen drivers involved in serious crashes.

Both male and female teen drivers with peer passengers were more likely to be distracted just before a crash as compared to teens who crashed while driving alone, according to the study. Among teens who said they were distracted by something inside the vehicle before they crashed, 71 percent of males and 47 percent of females said they were distracted by the actions of their passengers.

The survey also found that male drivers with passengers were nearly six times more likely to perform an illegal driving maneuver and more than twice as likely to drive aggressively just before a crash compared to males driving alone.

Females rarely drove aggressively, regardless of whether they had passengers in the car.

“Most teens take driving seriously and act responsibly behind the wheel. However, some may not realize how passengers can directly affect their driving,” Mirman said. “Teen passengers can intentionally and unintentionally encourage unsafe driving. Because it can be difficult for new drivers to navigate the rules of the road and manage passengers, it’s best to keep the number of passengers to a minimum for the first year.”

The studies, conducted with State Farm, were published Jan. 24 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

via USA Today

Mackenzie Brown, 16, not only has a new drivers license but life-saving knowledge that comes with the privilege.

She has received the “speech” from her grandfather, John Purser, All State Insurance Agency, assisted by her mother, Bree Brown.

“I do listen to what they say,” Mackenzie said. “It helps me understand the consequences of not obeying the law.

“Thanks to them, I know that every second under the wheel is important. One mistake and you can die.”

The reality of this comment is found in statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Safety Council. These organizations note that more than 250 Georgia families lose a teen driver in a car accident each year.

In addition, numbers show that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among young drivers ages 15-20, with teen traffic fatalities accounting for 44 percent of teen deaths in the U.S.

Purser emphasized that he does not want to see any teen become a statistic.

Georgia law requires drivers under 18 to have at least 40 hours of driving with parental supervision, six of those hours at night.

Under Georgia’s graduated driver’s license program, called the Teenage and Adult Driver Responsibility Act, drivers under 18 are prohibited from driving between midnight and 6 a.m.

For the first six months after obtaining a license, drivers under 18 may only drive with family members. After the first six months, no more than three non-family members under age 21 are allowed in the car.

The graduated license law has helped reduce teen fatalities in the 44 states that have the law. In Georgia, fatal crashes have decreased by more than a third since the law was enacted in 1997, according to a study by Emory University’s Center for Injury Control.

These numbers are one of the reasons Purser shares his experiences after a teen has received a license. The session is held with the parent’s permission.

“I want each individual to benefit from my knowledge,” he said. “I talk to them about the consequences of not obeying laws and to call a police officer in event of a wreck — even a fender bender.”

He said that a driver’s story could change if an officer is not at the scene of an accident.

Purser referenced an incident involving his daughter was a teen driver and a young woman backed into her car.

“I called the young lady’s dad and he had a different idea. He thought Bree backed into his daughter’s car. After the fact, it did not matter so we agreed to eat the expense. He paid for the damage to his daughter’s car and I assumed responsibility for mine.”

He said the incident was a learning experience for Bree, who admitted it is one she will not forget.

“I value his advice and wanted the same for Mackenzie,” she said.

Purser reminded that insurance is to protect a family in event of a mistake. He also encourages teens to consider the fact that insurance costs is based on driving records. The more wrecks they have, the more it will cost their parents.

“There are other consequences of not obeying laws,” he said. “Drinking and driving never pays. It can mean no license to operate a vehicle.”

Bree said her daughter faces a new set of challenges than she experienced. She focused on cell phones, texting and driving with devices that can be a distraction for a driver, especially teens.

“In 2011, we did a texting and driving campaign at Rockmart High School,” she said. “The idea was to ask them to take a pledge that could save their life: Don’t text and drive. We also ask that young drivers pledge to designate a texter. My daughter and I share this responsibility when riding together.”

via The Rockmark Journal